container gardens
The Charm of Window Boxes

   If you do not decorate your boxes in winter, if possible remove and store them until spring. This will prolong their life considerably, for thawing and heaving place a strain on wood or other material. Harmful, too, is the constant exposure to moisture, sun, snow, and ice. Dump soil out, if more is easily obtained in spring, and store boxes in dry place. In winter clean and repair them and apply a fresh coat of paint or stain.

PLANTS FOR WINDOW BOXES IN SHADE OR PARTIAL SHADE

   Fancy-leaved caladiums with German or English ivies or heart-leaved philodendron
   Ferns and coleus with sprenger asparagus
   Multiflora tuberous begonias and small-leaved English ivy
   Patience plant and torenia with vinca or English ivy
   Pink or red wax begonias and variegated vinca
   Red and white wax begonias with green or variegated wandering Jew
   Upright coleus and coleus Trailing Queen
   Upright coleus and vinca or English ivy
   Upright and hanging tuberous begonias Upright and trailing fuchsias
   Upright fuchsias and star of Bethlehem, both blue and white
   White, pink, and red wax begonias alone or with German or English ivies

PLANTS FOR WINDOW BOXES IN THE SUN

   Calendulas with lantanas California poppies with ageratum Dwarf marigolds with ageratum and vinca Geraniums with petunias and vinca
   Geraniums with ageratum or lobelia and vinca
   Geraniums with German or English ivies
   Geraniums and lantanas
   Geraniums with variegated gill-over-the-ground
   Geraniums with lobelia or ageratum and annual phlox
   Ivy geraniums and double petunias
   Lantanas with ageratum or lobelia
   Lantanas with dwarf marigolds
   Petunias with verbenas
   White geraniums with dwarf salvia and lobelia
   Zonal and ivy-leaved geraniums



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